Lonespeech

An elemental, uncanny collection of poems translated from one of Sweden’s most influential and beloved poets.

Poetry

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Format

eBook, Paperback

In Lonespeech, Ann Jäderlund rewires the correspondence between writers Ingeborg Bachmann and Paul Celan into a series of stark, runic poems about the fraught act of communication and its failures. Forsaking her reputation as a baroque poet, Jäderlund uses simple words and phrases in favor of an almost childlike simplicity, giving her poems, on first glance, the appearance of parables: mountains, sunlight, rivers, aortas. Upon closer inspection, the poems glitch, bend, and torque into something else, enigmatic and forceful, lending them, as Jäderlund says, the force of “clear velocity.”

Praise

In Ann Jäderlund’s paradoxical poems, it is the crystal clear loneliness that makes an encounter possible. From the cells and the body, the words break out into the wider world where another person is formed. The language is fragile, precise and resolutely subtle, as surprising as it is mind-expanding.

-Aase Berg
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Details
ISBN: 9781643622361
Paperback, 96 pages, 5 x 9 in
Publication Date: May 21, 2024
Translator(s): Johannes Göransson
Reviews
The translator’s relationship to the text is a cognate of that between sender and receiver. Göransson is equally receptive to Jäderlund’s gnomic intensity and to her elusive tendencies. His disinterest in the false axioms of untranslatability of poetry makes for a much better book than one looking for linguistic equivalences.
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Ann Jäderlund (b. 1955) is a poet as well as a translator and playwright. She is widely acknowledged as one of the leading Swedish poets over the past forty …

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Johannes Göransson (b. 1973) is the author of eight books of poetry, including Summer and the collaborative (with Sara Tuss Efrik) and The New Quarantine, a decreative translation of …

More about Johannes Göransson