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Call for Submissions: Radical Trans Poetics Anthology

WHAT: Nightboat Books is excited to invite submissions for an anthology of Radical Trans Poetics, co-edited by Andrea Abi-Karam and Kay Gabriel. By “radical” we mean to suggest two overlapping aims, both political and aesthetic. Politically, we’re interested in assembling poetry and poetics united against capitalism, racism and empire, in a horizon of gender and sexual l…

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In 1977, the radical sounds of a commune near Ithaca, NY resounded from within a little red book: "...there are two important things to remember about the coming revolutions. The first is that we will get our asses kicked. The second is that we will win."  The zealous words of Larry Mitchell hovered there above hands knotted in solidarity and celebration, an illustration by fellow Lavender Hill Commune member Ned Asta. The two collaborated to create what would become one of the most seminal queer texts in small press, The Faggots & Their Friends Between Revolutions. This quietly infamous…

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As the spring season approaches the balmy threshold of summer, we're saying so long to our fabulous, wonderful, super-awesome spring interns, Caelan and Alma. Read a little about who they are, what they did with us, and where they're headed as, with a tender smooch, we send them off with newly groomed wings through the musty gales of the anthropocene!   Caelan Ernest   Where did you grow up and how did you find your way to NYC? Before moving to Brooklyn in 2017, I lived in Rhode Island my whole life. I grew up in a small beachy town called Westerly. When I…

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Eleni Sikelianos, prolific poet, professor, and author of the new antigrowth epic, What I Knew, was gracious enough to talk with me about the latter's themes, her travels, the uncapturable, and of course (sorry, not sorry) astrology. This week, I'm sitting with and stirred by Eleni's assertion, "Poetry holds the place of ferality in language," a notion that saturates the poetics in What I Knew. Her prose here proves that potency can carry over in the right hands.    -June Shanahan   June Shanahan: What I Knew is so very located, in that so many of the poem’s sentiments are rooted in, or at least paired…

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Earlier this month, Publishers Weekly said of Chad Sweeney's stirring new book, Little Million Doors: "Sweeney masters the art of understatement in this book of forthright and delicate poems...What knowledge we gain, the poet hazards, might be found through absence and negation." rob mclennan adds, "Meaning becomes, if not fluid, something that shimmers, concurrently in multiple, and even contradictory directions. There is something radiant that emerges from his lines . . . LITTLE MILLION DOORS is a poem grand in scale, composed to the smallest and most immediate moments of grief, thinking and memory." Here, Sweeney himself reflects on the construction,…

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"I wanted to write a love poem that didn’t leave out all the problems, that inhabited this form of address to do other things at the same time: music criticism, historical analysis, thinking about gender and labor and real estate," says Stephanie Young, author of the new book-length poem Pet Sounds. Ahead of her NYC book launch, Stephanie and I got to talking on, among other things, the long-form poem and records that tie themselves to relationships.  -- June Shanahan     June Shanahan: In reading through your book, I kept the title in the back of my mind in order to kind of…

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Samiya Bashir, author of Field Theories Awarded prestigious 2019–20 Rome Prize! The American Academy in Rome has announced the winners of the 2019–20 Rome Prize and Italian Fellowships. These highly competitive fellowships support advanced independent work and research…

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      Brian Teare's new collection Doomstead Days figures itself an oblong baritone shape, a cargo ship of poems and various other fuels barrelling towards us. Opening with the clamor of a container ship's collision into the San Francisco Bay Bridge and the subsequent fallout, the book is as much witness and chronicle as it is elegy. In anticipation of his poignant new collection, Brian and I cyber-chatted about the Anthropocene, ecofeminism, elastic syntax, astrology, and more. —June Shanahan     June Shanahan: In considering the cover art for Doomstead Days, I found myself thinking about the frog-- how the slimy, webbed,…

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